What's New

CAHPI Announces Direct Membership

July 11, 2017
With pride, the CAHPI Board of Directors takes this opportunity to introduce CAHPI – as a truly National body... as an individual inspector, you will now be a member of CAHPI.

The Association is offering a warm welcome to new members; presenting them with opportunities to advance their professional standing.CAHPI will continue to be Canada’s Voice of the Home Inspection Industry, with which to speak to Canadian home inspectors and other industry stakeholders – to further our mutual interests on a National basis.CAHPI will have a single administration with a dedicated Board of Directors and staff to positively affect nationwide professional standards and communication.The membership qualification criteria will be a single National standard for professional designations. (Existing Registered Home Inspectors (RHI)® and National Certificate Holders will retain their designations and logo use privileges).
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Lire Plus - Annonce juillet 2017

CAHPI National Adopts CSA A770 Home Inspection Standard

November 1, 2016
At the National Annual General Meeting held on October 21st, CAHPI chose to adopt the Canadian Standards Association (CSA) A770 Home Inspection Standard as the National Standard of Practice (NSOP) of the Canadian Association of Home & Property Inspectors.Graham Clarke, P.Eng, RHI I am proud to see CAHPI positioning itself as a first adopter of a document like a National Standard of Canada. Many home inspection associations will face challenges and questions about our relevancy in the next few years as licensing laws are enacted and revised. CAHPI has positioned itself as a leader, rather than a follower, in the industry. CAHPI's leadership, exemplified by its continued participation in the development and maintenance of the Standard, has been recognized by the CSA.

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CSA Group Publishes the First National Standard on Home Inspections

March 10, 2016
CSA A770-16 Home Inspection was developed to help establish specific guidance for inspection through a single recognized standard. Inconsistency in the approach to inspections can create a risk for both consumers and home inspectors, and the lack of clear expectations for what a home inspection entails may cause increased liability for both parties. The CSA Group technical committee, comprised of a balanced representation of stakeholders including real estate agents, home inspectors, consumer protection groups, governments and others, agreed that a national standard would help provide clarity.

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Puchase A770 Standard

CAHPI Releases revised National Standards of Practice

October 2012
The National Standards of Practice are a set of guidelines for home and property inspectors to follow in the performance of their inspections. They are the most widely accepted Canadian home inspection guidelines in use, and include all the home's major systems and components. The National Standards of Practice and Code of Ethics are recognized by many related professionals as the definitive Standards for professional performance in the industry.These National Standards of Practice are being published to inform the public on the nature and scope of visual building inspections performed by home and property inspectors who are members of the Canadian Association of Home and Property Inspectors (CAHPI).

The purpose of the National Standards of Practice is to provide guidelines for home and property inspectors regarding both the inspection itself and the drafting of the inspection report, and to define certain terms relating to the performance of home inspections to ensure consistent interpretation

To ensure better public protection, home and property inspectors who are members of CAHPI should strive to meet these Standards and abide by the appropriate provincial/regional CAHPI Code of Ethics.

These Standards take into account that the following is a visual inspection of a building does not constitute an evaluation or a verification of compliance with building codes and Standards or regulations governing the construction industry or the health and safety industry, neither or with Standards and regulations governing insurability for the purpose of insuring risk.

 National Standards of Practice